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SOA Accepting Applications

SOA Logo 

Are you or is someone you know the next Liang Wang?

Shanghai Orchestra Academy — a partnership between the New York Philharmonic, Shanghai Symphony Orchestra, and Shanghai Conservatory of Music — aims to train emerging musicians to become eminent performing artists in orchestras around the world. And it recently began accepting applications. The application window closes October 20.

Good luck to all applicants!

Dream On Screen Sept. 12

Petrushka Popping Up

If you missed A Dancer’s Dream, our sold-out 2012–13 season finale, here’s some good news. As promised, it’s coming to movie theaters starting September 12.

The film — consisting of the complete concert broadcast, behind-the-scenes footage, and more goodies — opens in New York City on Thursday, September 12 at 7:00 p.m. at City Cinemas 123 (tickets). Another local screening will be on Wednesday, September 18 at 7:30 p.m. at Bow Tie Chelsea Cinemas (tickets). Then the film travels to Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, and other U.S. cities, and to Canada, the U.K., Russia, Italy, Germany, Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, and more.

Blending music with dance, live animation, pre-recorded video, puppetry, and circus arts, A Dancer’s Dream blurs the lines between reality and imagination, audience and performer. The production turned Avery Fisher hall into a dream world through costumes, sets, staging, and live filmmaking, Giants Are Small’s signature technique in which a real-time feed of musicians, puppets, and miniatures is projected above the Orchestra.

An audio recording of A Dancer’s Dream, produced by the Philharmonic, is also currently available for purchase in major online music stores, including iTunes, and available for streaming on Spotify.

Visit dreamonscreen.com for more information, including a slideshow of the concert premiere and information on local screenings (details are still being worked out; we will post as soon as possible).

What Does Boléro Look Like?

unravelling bolero

This, according to the late Canadian artist Anne Adams. In 1994, Adams completed “Unravelling Boléro,” a bar-by-bar depiction of Ravel's slinky, Spain-tinged piece. Rich color spectrum: check. One long, slow crescendo: check. Those pinks and oranges (over what looks like New York at night) toward the end are the key change, of course.

Adams had progressive aphasia, which can cause a flowering of activity in a brain area that integrates different senses. The kicker: Ravel had it, too, according to one scientific study. Another symptom is a compulsion toward repetition — could Boléro be an example?

Read the fascinating story and hear Boléro September 25 at the Opening Gala or the Free Dress Rehearsal.

Throwback Thursday

Jackie Kennedy and John D. Rockefeller III

50 years ago, two special guests attended Opening Night of the Philharmonic's 1963–64 season in style: Jackie Kennedy and John D. Rockefeller III.

You, too, can be among the season-opening attendees. The box office opens Sunday at noon, when you can grab tickets to the Opening Gala with Yo-Yo Ma, the subscription season-opening concerts with Artist-in-Residence Yefim Bronfman, and any of this season's other 100+ concerts. If you're a subscriber, you can get your tickets now and take advantage of the One Week Sale, which ends this Sunday at noon.

Photo courtesy of New York Philharmonic Digital Archives

Forever Becky Young

Becky Young and Bernstein

Before she became the Philharmonic's Associate Principal Viola, before she became host of the Very Young People's Concerts, Rebecca Young hobnobbed with Leonard Bernstein at a Young People's Concert back when she was a young person herself.

As host of the VYPCs, Becky says she gets to "run around the stage in a fun and lively way, engaging our youngest concert-goers as we introduce them to classical music."

Photo courtesy of the New York Philharmonic Digital Archives.

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