New York Philharmonic: What's New: Latest News and Stories About The New York Philharmonic
All concerts and events through January 5 are cancelled. Learn More about our response to Covid-19. Support the Philharmonic by donating your tickets.

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All concerts and events through January 5 are cancelled. Learn More about our response to Covid-19. Support the Philharmonic by donating your tickets.

Mahler’s New York: A Digital Festival Lives On

Over two weeks in April 2020, we presented Mahler’s New York: A Digital Festival, a celebration of the composer / conductor and erstwhile New Yorker / Philharmonic Music Director (1909–11). We dropped new content every day: video broadcasts of past performances, audio of the complete symphonies, an archival exhibit and virtual walking tour on Google Arts & Culture narrated by the musicians, activity guides for kids and families, recipes courtesy of Neue Galerie New York’s Café Sabarsky and Mahler’s sister, interviews with those who played under Mahler, Zoom backgrounds, the musicians performing Mahler together while quarantined, and more.

Although the festival has ended, we invite you to continue exploring Mahler’s life and music through the Mahler’s New York page and beyond.

In this period of global isolation and crisis, we hope you will take comfort and inspiration in Mahler’s music and musings.

“And now, in this solemn and deeply stirring moment, when the confusion and distractions of everyday life are lifted like a hood from our eyes, a voice of awe-inspiring solemnity chills our heart, a voice that, blinded by the mirage of everyday life, we usually ignore: ‘What next?’ it says. ‘What is life and what is death? Will we live on eternally? Is it all an empty dream or do our life and death have a meaning?’ And we must answer this question, if we are to go on living.” — Mahler, on his Symphony No. 2, Resurrection

Virtual Tour: Europe 2020 Continues with the Battle of the Brass


Today on Virtual Tour: Europe 2020 (May 11–21), we revisit a classic Philharmonic rivalry that played out on tours past.

It all started innocently enough in 2011 in Berlin, where Principal Trombone Joseph Alessi and then Principal Trumpet Philip Smith were looking for a place to practice. But things escalated quickly.

Before too long, a battle of the brass had ensued — one that would span years and cross borders.

Watch the Battle of the Brass.

(Videos by Chris Lee)

Virtual Tour: Europe 2020 Continues with Video Playlist


Today on Virtual Tour: Europe 2020 (May 11–21), we relive past visits to London, Cologne, Luxembourg, Amsterdam, Berlin, and Dresden — where the Orchestra would have performed this month if not for the pandemic — through the first of two video playlists shot by longtime Philharmonic photographer Chris Lee.

Today’s playlist, Onstage Playfeatures Lang Lang rehearsing, Principal Timpani Markus Rhoten’s mallet selection, a World Premiere in Cologne, Principal Cello Carter Brey’s words of wisdom, Petrushka at the Barbican, and more.

Come back tomorrow for #battleofthebrass.

Virtual Tour: Europe 2020 Launches with Slideshow

Welcome, willkommen, wëllkomm, welkom to Virtual Tour: Europe 2020 (May 11–21), a ten-day digital visit to London, Cologne, Luxembourg, Amsterdam, Berlin, and Dresden — where the Orchestra would have performed this month if not for the pandemic.

We’ll release new content almost every day at nyphil.org/virtualtourToday’s drop: the first of two slideshows (above), highlights of visits to these six cities from the past decade, captured by Philharmonic photographer Chris Lee. Next week (Monday, May 18), we’ll share pictures taken by the musicians themselves.

Also to come:

  • Three video broadcasts as Facebook and YouTube Premieres, featuring two past tour soloists — cellist Yo-Yo Ma (Thursday, May 14) and violinist Joshua Bell (Thursday, May 21) — and the soloist who would have appeared with the Orchestra on the 2020 European tour, Artist-in-Residence Daniil Trifonov (Monday, May 18)
  • Two radio broadcasts from past tour performances, the first of which is available here
  • A Love Letter to Amsterdam — where the Orchestra would have made history at the 100-year-old Mahler Festival — illuminating the Philharmonic’s century-old friendship with Amsterdam’s Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
  • A New York Philharmonic Archives online exhibit, in partnership with Google Arts & Culture, telling the little-known stories of the Orchestra’s historic tours to these cities
  • A Learning @ Home guide to new music in Amsterdam
  • A baking how-to video, in which Philharmonic violinist Anna Rabinova prepares the strudel she served to her colleagues on a past visit to Berlin

Remembering Lorne Munroe

Former Principal Cello Lorne Munroe 

The New York Philharmonic deeply mourns the passing of Lorne Munroe, Principal Cello (1964–96). His 32-year tenure included more than 150 concerto collaborations, including with Music Directors Bernstein (who hired him), Boulez, Mehta, and Masur. An unfailingly kind and unflappable gentleman, he passed along his legacy, learned from teachers including Piatigorsky, to his students at the Philadelphia University for the Arts and The Juilliard School. The Philharmonic extends condolences to his children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren.

(Photo by Chris Lee: former Principal Cello Lorne Munroe bows after performing Fauré’s Elegy with the New York Philharmonic, led by then Music Director Zubin Mehta, in January 1990)

Remembering Lynn Harrell

Cellist Lynn Harrell with the New York Philharmonic in 2006 

The New York Philharmonic deeply mourns the passing of our good friend Lynn Harrell. The magnificent cellist made 40 concerto appearances with the Orchestra, beginning with his 1961 debut at age 16 on a nationally telecast Young People’s Concert hosted by then Music Director Leonard Bernstein (clip below). We remember Lynn’s warmth, kindness, and extraordinary musicianship, and extend condolences to his family and friends.

(Photo by Chris Lee: Lynn Harrell bowing after performing Shostakovich’s Cello Concerto No. 1, led by then Music Director Lorin Maazel, in 2006)

Mahler Grooves: A Day-Long Celebration

Mahler Grooves 

Set your alarm. From 8:00 a.m. until 9:00 p.m. EDT tomorrow (Thursday, April 23), we present to you Mahler Grooves: A Day-Long Celebration.

The main event will be Mahler Grooves, a broadcast at 7:30 p.m. EDT featuring Mahler’s Piano Quartet, the Adagietto from Mahler’s Symphony No. 5, and a piano reduction of selections from Mahler’s Symphony No. 10 performed by Philharmonic musicians. Viewers can stream the broadcast on Facebook and YouTube Premieres (available on-demand afterward).

Then head over to Instagram Live for the after-party, Mahler Spins: a DJ set with Assistant Principal Timpani / Percussion Kyle Zerna (a.k.a. Dr. Sweers).

Leading up to the broadcast and after-party, we present:

  • Welcome on Instagram (8:00 a.m.): tell us what music makes you groove; the crowd-sourced playlist will drop during Mahler Drinks: Part II (see below)
  • Mahler Wakes on Facebook and YouTube (9:30 a.m.): violinist Yulia Ziskel will prepare Wiener Schnitzel with this recipe from Neue Galerie New York’s Café Sabarsky
  • Mahler Works on nyphil.org/mahlerny (11:00 a.m.): we’ll unveil three groovy Mahler-themed Zoom backgrounds
  • Mahler Rests on Facebook and YouTube (12:00 p.m.): a midday moment of self-care and reflection in the form of a virtual visit to Central Park in partnership with the Central Park Conservancy, set to selections from Mahler’s Symphony No. 3
  • Mahler Drinks ’n Draws on Instagram (1:00 p.m.): an alcohol-free cocktail demonstration by the musician bartenders of Listen Bar, caricaturist Chris Tabares, and Principal Timpani Markus Rhoten
  • Mahler Eats on Instagram (2:30 p.m.): Philharmonic violinist Yulia Ziskel, Acting Associate Principal Clarinet Pascual Martínez Forteza, trumpet player Ethan Bensdorf, and Assistant Principal Librarian Sara Griffin talk Mahler over lunch
  • Mahler Strolls on nyphil.org/mahlerny (4:00 p.m.): we’ll take a virtual stroll through Mahler’s New York, guided by Philharmonic musicians and presented in partnership with Google Arts & Culture
  • Mahler Drinks: Part II on Spotify (6:30 p.m.): we’ll invite you to host your own Happy Hours, using the crowd-sourced “What makes you groove?” playlist (Spotify), plus the Zoom backgrounds on nyphil.org/mahlerny and Neue Galerie New York’s Café Sabarsky Wien 1900 cocktail recipe

Check out the full schedule here. Follow along on our Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Spotify, and Twitter channels.

Check out the namesake of Mahler Grooves in the New York Philharmonic Digital Archives here. More backstory here.

It’s all part of Mahler’s New York: A Digital Festival, a two-week celebration of our former Music Director, one-time New Yorker, and beloved composer. Check out what else is planned for the week here.

Mahler’s New York: A Digital Festival

This past Thursday we launched Mahler’s New York: A Digital Festival (April 16–30), a two-week celebration of our former Music Director, one-time New Yorker, and beloved composer.

The digital festival comprises seven video broadcasts, audio of the complete symphonies, an online archival exhibit and virtual walking tour presented in partnership with Google Arts & Culture, recipes provided by Neue Galerie New York’s Café Sabarsky, activity guides for kids and families, musical telegrams from the musicians, and Mahler Grooves — a full day of Mahler fun.

Part of the fun is dropping content every day throughout the two weeks, to approximate the experience of a live, in-person festival. Here are this week’s highlights:

Next week, look forward to:

  • Monday, April 27, 7:30 p.m. EDT: rebroadcast of Mahler’s Symphony No. 7, with former Music Director Alan Gilbert conducting the Philharmonic alongside musicians from orchestras around the world
  • Tuesday, April 28: audio of Mahler’s symphony No. 9, led by Alan Gilbert
  • Wednesday, April 29: audio of Mahler’s Symphony No. 10 from two recordings, one led by Dimitri Mitropoulos and the other led by Daniel Harding
  • Thursday, April 30 at 7:30 p.m. EDT: first-ever rebroadcast of Mahler’s Symphony No. 2, Resurrection, led by Leonard Bernstein in 1963 in tribute to JFK two days after the assassination

Check out the full schedule here. Explore the full festival at nyphil.org/mahlerny.

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