New York Philharmonic: What's New: Latest News and Stories About The New York Philharmonic

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PHOTOS: 2018 Lunar New Year Concert and Gala

The New York Philharmonic welcomed the Year of the Dog with the seventh annual Lunar New Year Concert and Gala, a festive evening of Eastern and Western music presented by Starr International Foundation and conducted by Long Yu. The concert included Olympic-level Ping Pong players giving the U.S. Premiere of Andy Akiho’s Ricochet, also featuring Philharmonic violinist Elizabeth Zeltser and percussionist David Cossin, plus Beethoven’s Choral Fantasy with 13-year-old Serena Wang and the Farmers’ Chorus of the Yunnan Province in its first-ever appearance outside China. Gala guests began the evening with a colorful cocktail reception, and gathered after the concert for a dinner of Lunar New Year delicacies.

Jaap van Zweden and the New York Philharmonic To Tour Asia in March 2018

 

Today we announced details of our ten-day Asia tour next month, led by Music Director Designate Jaap van Zweden. His first international tour with the Orchestra will feature eight concerts in five cities: Beijing, Kyoto, Tokyo, Nagoya, and Taipei.

“Touring is a wonderful vehicle not only to share our music-making with audiences around the world but also to deepen our musi­cal relationship,” Jaap says. “It gives us a rare oppor­tunity to grow and bond.”

It’s a sentiment shared by Philharmonic cellist Nathan Vickery: “We can de­velop a better understanding of what Jaap is showing us in the moment on­stage. The only way to do that is by spending time together. The rapport we build on this tour can set us up to be re­ally on the top of our game when he be­comes Music Director this September.”

The soloists on the tour are Beijing-born pianist Yuja Wang (performing Brahms’s Piano Concerto No. 1 and Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 3) and Japanese-American violinist Ryu Goto (performing Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto). Jaap will also conduct Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring (which New York audiences will get to hear in his opening concerts as Music Director in September), Mahler’s Fifth Symphony, and J. Wagenaar’s Cyrano de Bergerac Overture.

Live on Facebook: Jaap van Zweden Conducts Wagner’s Die Walküre (Act I) and John Luther Adams’s Dark Waves

The live video has ended. Below is the reposted video of the Wagner. Our rights to repost the John Luther Adams have expired. 

If you can’t make it to David Geffen Hall this evening to see Music Director Designate Jaap van Zweden conduct Wagner’s Die Walküre (Act I) — featuring Heidi Melton (soprano), Simon O’Neill (tenor), and John Relyea (bass) — and John Luther Adams’s Dark Waves, watch it live on Facebook! It starts at 7:25 PM EST.

Directed by Habib Azar, the broadcast will later be available for on-demand viewing on this page, YouTube, and Facebook. It’s the Philharmonic’s fifth live concert broadcast on Facebook.

(Photo: Chris Lee)

New York, Meet Jaap: 2018–19 Season Announced

New York, meet Jaap. (Pronounced “Yahp.”)

Jaap becomes Music Director of the New York Philharmonic in September 2018, and last night we proudly announced the highly anticipated details of his inaugural season.

The season is anchored by three pillars, all led by Jaap
Music of Conscience will explore how composers have responded to the social issues of their time through Shostakovich’s Chamber Symphony (in opposition to Stalin), Beethoven’s Eroica Symphony (in opposition to Napoleon), John Corigliano’s Symphony No. 1 (his “personal response to the AIDS crisis”), and the World Premiere of David Lang’s prisoner of the state (based on Beethoven’s Fidelio, about unjust political imprisonment).
New York Stories: Threads of Our City will feature musical expressions of the immigrant experience in New York. The centerpiece will be the World Premiere of Julia Wolfe’s Fire in my mouth, based on the 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City, which killed 146 garment workers, most of them young, female immigrants.
The Art of Andriessen will spotlight the music of Dutch composer Louis Andriessen, winner of the Philharmonic’s Marie-Josée Kravis Prize for New Music. The Orchestra will perform the World Premiere of Louis Andriessen’s Agamemnon, as well as TAO.

We introduce two new-music series, both hosted by Creative Partner Nadia SirotaNightcap at the Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse and Sound ON at The Appel Room, Jazz at Lincoln Center — and additional World Premieres by Ashley Fure and Conrad Tao, conducted by Jaap.

We also open our doors to our fellow New Yorkers with Phil the Hall, special $5 concerts for the city’s community and service professionals.

Other highlights: 
Jaap leading works by composers ranging from Mozart, Brahms, Bruckner, and Stravinsky to Ives, John Adams, and Stucky
The debuts of conductors Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla, Emmanuelle Haïm, and Tugan Sokhiev
Movie scores performed live to the complete films (There Will Be Blood, 2001: A Space Odyssey, The Red Violin, Home Alone, and Bugs Bunny at the Symphony II)
Baritone Matthias Goerne as The Mary and James G. Wallach Artist-in-Residence, plus violinist Leila Josefowicz, vocalist Patti LuPone, cellist Yo-Yo Ma, pianist Daniil Trifonov, and pianists Emanuel Ax, Yefim Bronfman, and Maurizio Pollini

For even more, check out Season Highlights plus Philharmonic musicians’ picks and guest artist greetings

Play us out, Jaap: “This season is a celebration of groundbreaking music, both new and classic, and I look forward to connecting to our vital public and to honoring our traditions while establishing new traditions for the future. To be back in New York is thrilling; to be part of the heartbeat of New York City is exhilarating.”

(Photo: Chris Lee)

On the Cover: Rémi Pelletier

Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? Should I become a professional violist or a sushi chef? These are the universal questions everyone wrestles with at some point. 

Maybe not that last one. But New York Philharmonic violist Rémi Pelletier really did face exactly that fork in the path of his life. (And when you think about it, both involve rigorous training of hand, eye, and mind to be able to create an experience of beauty and delight.)

Although he had studied viola seriously since childhood, he was pursuing a career as a sushi chef. His sushi mentor told him he had to choose between the two.

Rémi agonized, but clarity came in the form of a recurring dream in which he was running through a forest, looking for his viola. 

Learn more about Rémi and his journey to become a Philharmonic musician in his Q & A video above. 

You can find Rémi on the cover of Playbill in February and March, and he’ll be featured on the Philharmonic’s social media channels. Follow us on FacebookTwitterInstagramSnapchat, and Tumblr for more!

Learn more about Rémi Pelletier

Very Young People’s Concert at Lincoln Center Education’s Big Umbrella Festival, for Children on Autism Spectrum

We’re proud to share that Musicians from the Philharmonic will perform a Very Young People’s Concert April 14 at the Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse as part of Lincoln Center Education’s Big Umbrella Festival –– the world’s first month-long festival dedicated to arts programs for children on the autism spectrum and their families.

This Very Young People’s Concert will feature pre-concert musical games with musicians and a half-hour performance of Martinů’s La revue de cuisine, complete with audience participation and story with Philippe the Penguin, all hosted by Associate Principal Viola Rebecca Young. The host of the Philharmonic’s popular Very Young People’s Concerts sums up her goal as: “To make the audiences have so much fun they want to come back!”

Young People’s Concerts, In-School Tour Bring Harlem Renaissance to NYC Schoolkids

Duke Ellington jazz rhythms and Langston Hughes poetry are echoing through the floors and corridors of David Geffen Hall. Why? This week’s Young People’s Concert and Young People’s Concerts for Schools, which are all about the Harlem Renaissance.

For the kids who will come with their classmates to Young People’s Concerts for Schools, Wednesday through Friday, the concert will cap a curriculum, created by the Philharmonic’s Education department, that they’ve been studying with their teachers. For many, this curriculum was further enriched by in-school concerts by the Philharmonic’s Teaching Artist Ensemble in November at schools in all five boroughs. The concerts featured music by some of the same composers on this week’s program, such as Ellington and William Grant Still. Read More...

Music Academy of the West Fellows Conclude Immersion with New York Philharmonic

For the fourth consecutive year, the New York Philharmonic hosted a group of fellows from Music Academy of the West selected to participate in the New York Philharmonic Global Academy Fellowship Program — an immersion in the life of an orchestra musician.

From January 18 to 29, ten fellows, selected by audition, came to New York as Zarin Mehta Fellows, working closely with Philharmonic musicians in one-on-one lessons, mock auditions, and chamber music coaching. They even rehearsed and played alongside Philharmonic musicians in selections from Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet for the Orchestra’s January 25–27 subscription concerts conducted by Stéphane Denève. “Different musical tableaux sprung vividly to life bringing to mind choreographic images,” concluded the review in Bachtrack. “One couldn’t ask for much more.” Read More...

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