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Shepherd School of Music Fellows Conclude Immersion with New York Philharmonic

Posted May 01, 2017

For the second consecutive year, the New York Philharmonic hosted a group of fellows from Rice University's Shepherd School of Music selected to participate in the New York Philharmonic Global Academy Fellowship Program — an immersion in the life of an orchestra musician.

From April 22–30 six fellows, selected by audition, came to New York as Zarin Mehta Fellows, working closely with Philharmonic musicians in one-on-one lessons, mock auditions, and chamber music coaching. They even rehearsed and played alongside Philharmonic musicians in Richard Strauss’s Also sprach Zarathustra during the subscription concerts April 27 and 29, conducted by The Marie-Josée Kravis Composer-in-Residence Esa-Pekka Salonen.

Above: After the April 29 concert, the Zarin Mehta Fellows posed in the Green Room flanked by Robert Yekovich, Dean of the Shepherd School of Music (left), and New York Philharmonic Global Academy Director Michèle Balm (right). The Fellows are (left to right) clarinetist John Diodati, trumpet player Daniel Egan, oboist Tamer Edlebi, bassoonist Benjamin Roidl-Ward, flutist Kayla Faurie, and percussionist Robert O’Brien.

Rice University’s Shepherd School of Music is a partner in the New York Philharmonic Global Academy, which is connecting with institutions worldwide to train pre-professional orchestra musicians of the future by harnessing the Philharmonic’s deep resources through national and international collaborations. Described by Gilbert as “a window into the real life of the orchestral musician,” the Fellowship allows students to learn directly from Philharmonic musicians, a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

1. On April 24 the Fellows visited the New York Philharmonic Archives for a presentation by Archivist / Historian Barbara Haws (left):

2. New York Philharmonic Vice President, Education, Theodore Wiprud (center) leads a panel discussion on Teaching Artistry and the New York Philharmonic’s Education Programs:

3. Zarin Mehta Fellow Kayla Faurie (left) performs Strauss’s Also sprach Zarathustra with the New York Philharmonic on April 29:

4. Zarin Mehta Fellow Benjamin Roidl-Ward (center) holds his own in the bassoon section during the April 29 concert:

 

5. “As a kid I revered the sound of this orchestra. ... And after a journey full of peaks and valleys, tonight I was fortunate enough to play a concert at the institution I had so long adored.” Zarin Mehta Fellow Daniel Egan reflects on the Fellowship in a Facebook post:


(Photos: 3–4 Chris Lee; top, 1–2 Ken Yanagisawa)