New York Philharmonic: What's New: Latest News and Stories About The New York Philharmonic

The New York Philharmonic

Update Browser

Pages don't look right?

You are using a browser that does not support the technology used on our website.

Please select a different browser or use your phone or tablet to access our site.

Download: Firefox | Chrome | Safari

If you're using Internet Explorer, please update to the latest version.

What’s New

December Playbill Editorial Content Now Available Online

 

Read all about it!

We are delighted to share the feature stories from this month’s Philharmonic issue of Playbill, including a welcome letter from President and CEO Deborah Borda, a profile of Artist-in-Residence Matthias Goerne, an exploration of the theatrical aspects of Handel’s Messiah, a round-up of what some of our musicians do before and after our New Year’s Eve concert, a summary of Philharmonic news and other items of note, and photos of artists, donors, and VIPs at various events.

This Playbill editorial content joins the Program Notes (written by Program Annotator James M. Keller), which are available here.

75 Years Ago Today: Bernstein’s Famed Philharmonic Debut

75 years ago today, Leonard Bernstein made his famed New York Philharmonic debut at Carnegie Hall at age 25 famously filling in with a few hours’ notice and without rehearsal for an ailing Bruno Walter. The concert was broadcast nationally, and The New York Times ran a front-page story the next day, calling his performance “a good American success story.” Have a listen to the radio announcement from that famed afternoon.

Leonard Bernstein
 

In 1989, Bernstein recalled his debut:

“When it came to the time — that very day — all I can remember is standing there in the wings shaking and being so scared. There was no rehearsal. I had just come from seeing Bruno Walter, who very sweetly and very quickly — wrapped up in blankets because he had the flu — went over the score of Don Quixote with me. He showed me a few tricky spots where he cut off here but didn’t cut off there; here you give it an extra upbeat, and so on.... The time seemed to hang heavy till 3:00 p.m., even though I had to go over some of the tricky spots in Don Quixote with the cello and viola soloists and the concertmaster. The thing that was obsessing me, possessing me, was the opening of the Schumann overture, which is very tricky because it starts with a rest — the downbeat is a rest. If they don't come in together, the whole concert is sunk. I mean, I can’t once go ‘bop, bop, bop,’ and make sure they can do it. So, this was like a nightmare. I had to go on and do, untried, this thing of such difficulty. You know, I’ve heard other people come to grief in that opening bar. Then I finally went and talked with the guys and they said, ‘Good luck.’ [Philharmonic manager] Bruno Zirato said, ‘Hey, Lenny. Good luck, baby.’ Oh, he was very fatherly and gave me big bear hugs. And that was about it.”

Leonard Bernstein Leonard Bernstein
Photos: New York Philharmonic Archives

Young People’s Concert Host Fred Child’s Waltzing Spotify Playlist

And now, a word from the host of our upcoming Young People’s Concert, Fred Child of American Public Media’s Performance Today:

“Greetings, musical friends! I’m honored to host the New York Philharmonic Young People’s Concert on November 17, when we’ll dance across the universe with the ever-spinning sound of the waltz. Here are some examples to enjoy between now and then!” — Fred Child

Happy listening to these selections from Saturday’s concert ... plus other waltzing works!

Wow! Watch Frank Huang Play the National Anthem Before Nets-Rockets Game

Last Friday, on his day off between performances of Barber’s Violin Concerto, Concertmaster Frank Huang — who claims to have a good outside shot — traveled to the Barclays Center in Brooklyn to perform his own arrangement of the National Anthem before the Brooklyn Nets played his beloved Houston Rockets.

Frank grew up in Houston, and basketball was his go-to hobby. His mom didn’t let him join a team, to protect his hands and fingers. He was concertmaster of the Houston Symphony before coming to the Philharmonic.

Although we of course root for the Nets and Knicks, we are proud (and not surprised) that Frank’s virtuosity spurred the Rockets to victory.

Bravo, Frank!

(Video: Courtesy Brooklyn Nets; Thumbnail Photos: Chris Lee)

Magazine Names Aaltje van Zweden One of 80 Strong Women for Her Autism Advocacy

Aaltje van Zweden (at left in photo), the wife of Music Director Jaap van Zweden, is a stoere vrouw, Dutch for strong woman, according to Margriet, one of the oldest and most famous magazines in The Netherlands.

For its 80th anniversary, Margriet has chosen 80 women to be celebrated for making large and small dreams come true. That certainly describes Aaltje’s work with the Papageno Foundation, which she and Jaap founded to help autistic young people engage with and be part of the community at large.

The kick-off event is today at the Amsterdam Museum, with Aaltje as one of the keynote speakers. She will discuss her work with the Papageno Foundation and her book, Om wie je bent (Who You Are), about her experience with her son Benjamin, who is autistic.

Congratulations, Aaltje!

Watch Music Director Jaap van Zweden on 60 Minutes

Last night more than 11 million Americans got to “Meet Jaap,” according to the average viewership of 60 Minutes. The most viewed news program on television featured our new Maestro Jaap van Zweden in a long and touching segment that followed him from his youth to his new position here in New York, hosted by Lesley Stahl.

In case you missed it, watch it above!

Go to top