Jaap van Zweden conducts Wagenaar, Korngold, and Beethoven

The New York Philharmonic

Update Browser

Pages don't look right?

You are using a browser that does not support the technology used on our website.

Please select a different browser or use your phone or tablet to access our site.

Download: Firefox | Chrome | Safari

If you're using Internet Explorer, please update to the latest version.

Jaap van Zweden conducts Wagenaar, Korngold, and Beethoven

Recorded November 28, 2014

More

Music Director

Jaap van Zweden

Conductor Jaap van Zweden has become an international presence on three continents over the past decade. The 2018–19 season marks his first as the 26th Music Director of the New York Philharmonic. He continues as Music Director of the Hong Kong Philharmonic, a post he has held since 2012. Guest engagements this season include the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Amsterdam’s Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Munich Philharmonic, Orchestre de Paris, San Francisco Symphony, and Dallas Symphony Orchestra — where he is Conductor Laureate, having just completed a ten-year tenure as Music Director. He has appeared as guest conductor with many other leading orchestras around the globe, among them the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, The Cleveland Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Vienna Philharmonic, Berlin Philharmonic, Orchestre national de France, and London Symphony Orchestra.

In his inaugural season as Music Director of the New York Philharmonic, Jaap van Zweden conducts repertoire ranging from five World Premieres to symphonic cornerstones. He presides over three season pillars — each presenting a World Premiere — that contextualize music through programs complemented by citywide collaborations. Music of Conscience explores composers’ responses to the social issues of their time, with music by Beethoven, Shostakovich, John Corigliano, and David Lang. New York Stories: Threads of Our City looks at musical expressions of the immigrant experience in New York, with music by Julia Wolfe. The Art of Andriessen spotlights the music of Dutch composer Louis Andriessen. Maestro van Zweden also welcomes New Yorkers to Phil the Hall, concerts for community and service professionals; the Annual Free Memorial Day Concert; and the Concerts in the Parks, Presented by Didi and Oscar Schafer.

Jaap van Zweden has made numerous acclaimed recordings, the most recent of which features live New York Philharmonic performances of Beethoven’s Symphonies Nos. 5 and 7, released on CD and for streaming and download in February 2018; this release launched the Philharmonic’s partnership with Decca Gold, Universal Music Group’s newly established U.S. classical music label. In 2018 he completed a four-year project with the Hong Kong Philharmonic, conducting the first-ever performances in Hong Kong of Wagner’s Ring Cycle, which have been recorded and released on Naxos Records. His highly praised performances of Lohengrin, Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, and Parsifal — the last of which earned him the prestigious Edison Award for Best Opera Recording in 2012 — are available on CD and DVD.

Born in Amsterdam, Jaap van Zweden was appointed at age 19 as the youngest-ever concertmaster of Amsterdam’s Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra. He began his conducting career almost 20 years later, in 1996. He remains Honorary Chief Conductor of the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic, where he was Chief Conductor from 2005 to 2013, and served as Chief Conductor of the Royal Flanders Orchestra from 2008 to 2011. Jaap van Zweden was named Musical America’s 2012 Conductor of the Year in recognition of his critically acclaimed work as Music Director of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra and as guest conductor with the most prestigious U.S. orchestras.

In 1997 Jaap van Zweden and his wife, Aaltje, established the Papageno Foundation to support families of children with autism. The Foundation has grown into a multifaceted organization that focuses on the development of children and young adults with autism. The Foundation provides in-home music therapy through a national network of qualified music therapists in The Netherlands; opened the Papageno House in 2015 (with Her Majesty Queen Maxima in attendance) for young adults with autism to live, work, and participate in the community; created a research center at the Papageno House for early diagnosis and treatment of autism and for analyzing the effects of music therapy on autism; develops funding opportunities to support autism programs; and, most recently, launched the app TEAMPapageno, which allows children with autism to communicate with each other through music composition.

Learn more about Jaap van Zweden

More

Violin

Hilary Hahn

Two-time Grammy Award-winning violinist Hilary Hahn took her first lessons shortly before her fourth birthday, made her orchestral debut at 12, completed her university requirements at 16, and received her bachelor’s degree at 19, after having delayed her studies to expand her touring career. Since she began recording at 16 Ms. Hahn has released 15 albums on the Deutsche Grammophon and Sony labels, three DVDs, an Oscar-nominated movie sound track, an award-winning children’s recording, and various compilations. Her recordings have received every critical prize in the international press. In 2010 she released Jennifer Higdon’s Violin Concerto alongside Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto; Higdon’s work, written for Ms. Hahn, went on to win the Pulitzer Prize. In 2013 Ms. Hahn released In 27 Pieces: the Hilary Hahn Encores, the culmination of a multiyear project to renew the encore genre. Her next album, slated for spring 2015, references her musical heritage, featuring works by Mozart and Vieuxtemps, and recorded with longtime colleagues Paavo Järvi and the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen. An avid writer, she posts journal entries and articles on hilaryhahn.com and produces a YouTube channel on which she frequently interviews guests from around the world. Ms. Hahn has appeared on the covers of most major classical music publications; has been featured in Vogue, Elle, Town & Country, and Marie Claire; was named “America’s Best Young Classical Musician” by TIME magazine in 2001; and appeared on The Tonight Show with Conan O’Brien in 2010. Her projects beyond the classical world include two records by the alt-rock band …And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead, Tom Brosseau’s album Grand Forks, and a tour with folk-rock singer-songwriter Josh Ritter. Hilary Hahn made her Philharmonic debut in 1994, performing Bruch’s Violin Concerto No. 1, conducted by Paavo Berglund; she most recently joined Colin Davis and the Orchestra in December 2010 for Elgar’s Violin Concerto.

More

Cyrano de Bergerac Overture

JOHAN WAGENAAR (1862-1941)
Cyrano de Bergerac Overture (1905)

This best-known of Wagenaar’s works is a concert overture (meaning it doesn’t introduce an opera or play, but stands on its own) inspired by Edmund Rostand’s play of the same name that had been premiered in 1897, eight years before the music was composed. Many commentators hear echoes in Cyrano of the tone poems of Richard Strauss, whom Wagenaar admired it certainly does paint a musical picture and capture the spirit and character of the famed character endowed with an epic nose. Also reminiscent of Strauss are the sign posts Wagenaar provides as to what the music is portraying; for example, “Heroism,” “Strength of Character,” and “Humor,” etc. The overture opens with a bravado flourish — you can almost see José Ferrer in the 1950 movie leap onto a table, wielding his sword — and then transforms into a more poetic, romantic section; before long, the expansive sound of horns suggests adventure and daring-do. This all-too-infrequently heard overture is melodic, witty, and fun to hear.

More

Violin Concerto

ERICH WOLFGANG KORNGOLD (1897–1947)
Violin Concerto (1945)

Korngold was a classical composer who left Vienna for Hollywood in the 1930s. With his legacy of 23 memorable film scores he pioneered the art of original film music by making it symphonic in scope and sophisticated in feel. Not surprisingly, his concert works and film music cross-pollinated each other, as is evident in his Violin Concerto, where major themes are borrowed from four films: Another Dawn, Juárez, Anthony Adverse, and The Prince and the Pauper. At the wildly successful 1947 premiere, by Jascha Heifetz and the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra, the concerto received one of the longest ovations in local memory, and audiences have loved it for the nearly seven decades since. With the soloist spending most of his time in the violin’s high register, the opening is lyrical, with animated sections interspersed; the second movement, Romance, is nothing short of rapturous, filled with sweeping harmonies and glorious melodies; the finale is full of spectacular pyrotechnics, ending with a vigorous final chord.

More

Symphony No. 7

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN (1770–1827)
Symphony No. 7 (1811–12)

While everyone may have a favorite Beethoven symphony, it is his Seventh that listeners usually think is the most fun. It dances with rhythmic drive, vibrant energy — and possibly irrational exuberance, considering the composer’s circumstances during its creation. He was not in good health, had family and money woes, and was hopelessly in love with his “Immortal Beloved.” Yet this symphony pulses with life and joy. Part of the reason might be the fact that it relies heavily on rhythm, rather than melody, with the same notes being repeated over and over again in various patterns. Jonathan Kramer writes that “it is this emphasis on rhythms…that gives this composition impetuous, exuberant vitality that has reminded many commentators of carnivals.” The symphony opens slowly and then bursts into a thrilling Vivace; the Allegretto had to be encored at the premiere; and the wild abandon of the final movement is nearly manic in character, putting timpani and horns through their paces. Fellow-composers wondered about Beethoven’s state of mind when he wrote the piece. Was he drunk? Had he gone mad? But Wagner said it best, calling the symphony “the apotheosis of the dance itself.”

  • Listen Anytime

    Alec Baldwin

     

    Listen To A Broadcast Online
  • Philharmonic History

    From the Archives

     

    Visit the Digital Archives
  • Concert Downloads

    img

     

    Search Recordings