Mozart and Tchaikovsky
All concerts and events through June 13, 2021 are cancelled. Learn more about our response to COVID-19. Support the Philharmonic by donating your tickets.

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All concerts and events through June 13, 2021 are cancelled. Learn more about our response to COVID-19. Support the Philharmonic by donating your tickets.

Calendar

CANCELLED: Mozart and Tchaikovsky

Location

David Geffen Hall

Directions
Price Range

$33-136

Date & Times

3

Dec, 2020

Thursday, 7:30 PM

4

Dec, 2020

Friday, 2:00 PM

5

Dec, 2020

Saturday, 8:00 PM

Event Info

David Robertson leads a Mozart “double concerto,” abounding in melodies that have enchanted audiences for almost 250 years and featuring our virtuoso flute and harp Principals in a heavenly combination of solo instruments. Plus Tchaikovsky’s Little Russian Symphony, inspired by a rich tradition of folk melodies, including the moving song “The Crane.”

Program To Include

R. Strauss

Wind Serenade

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Mozart

Flute and Harp Concerto

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Tchaikovsky

Symphony No. 2, Little Russian

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Artists

David Robertson

Conductor

David Robertson

Conductor

David Robertson

Conductor

David Robertson has served in numerous artistic leadership positions, such as chief conductor and artistic director of the Sydney Symphony Orchestra, and a transformative 13-year tenure as music director of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, solidifying its status among the nation’s most innovative, establishing fruitful relationships with a spectrum of artists, and garnering a 2014 Grammy for the Nonesuch release of John Adams’s City Noir. Conductor, artist, thinker, and American musical visionary, he is a highly sought-after podium figure in the worlds of opera, orchestral, and new music, celebrated worldwide as a champion of contemporary composers, an ingenious and adventurous programmer, and a masterful communicator whose passionate advocacy for the art form is widely recognized. 

Mr. Robertson’s earlier leadership positions include posts at the Orchestre national de Lyon, Ensemble InterContemporain as a protégé of Pierre Boulez, principal guest conductor at the BBC Symphony Orchestra, and a Carnegie Hall Perspectives Artist, where he has conducted numerous orchestras. He appears regularly with Amsterdam’s Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Czech Philharmonic, Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, and other major European orchestras and festivals. He continues a longstanding collaboration with the New York Philharmonic, and conducts numerous North American ensembles, including the Montreal, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, National, Houston, and Dallas symphony orchestras and the Juilliard Orchestra, where he serves as director of conducting studies, distinguished visiting faculty. 

He continues to build upon his deep conducting relationship with The Metropolitan Opera, including James Robinson’s production of Porgy and Bess (2019) and the premiere of Phelim McDermott’s production of Così fan tutte (2018). Since his 1996 Met Opera debut, leading Janáček’s The Makropulos Case, he has conducted projects ranging from The Met premiere of John Adams’s The Death of Klinghoffer (2014) to the 2016 revival of Janáček’s Jenůfa; and many favorites. He conducts at the world’s most prestigious opera houses, including Milan’s Teatro alla Scala, Paris’s Théâtre du Châtelet, and those in Rome, San Francisco, and Santa Fe.

David Robertson is the recipient of numerous awards, and in 2010 was made a Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the Government of France. He is devoted to supporting young musicians and has worked with students at festivals ranging from Aspen to Tanglewood to Lucerne. 

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Robert Langevin

Flute

Robert Langevin

Flute

Robert Langevin

Flute

With the start of the 2000–01 season, Robert Langevin joined the New York Philharmonic as Principal Flute, in The Lila Acheson Wallace Chair. In May 2001, he made his solo debut with the Orchestra in the North American premiere of Siegfried Matthus’s Concerto for Flute and Harp with Philharmonic Principal Harp Nancy Allen and Music Director Kurt Masur. His October 2012 solo performance in Nielsen’s Flute Concerto, conducted by Music Director Alan Gilbert, was recorded for inclusion in The Nielsen Project, the Orchestra’s multi-season traversal of all of the Danish composer’s symphonies and concertos, to be released by Dacapo Records.

Prior to the Philharmonic, Mr. Langevin held the Jackman Pfouts Principal Flute Chair of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and was an adjunct professor at Duquesne University, in Pittsburgh. Mr. Langevin served as associate principal of the Montreal Symphony Orchestra for 13 years, playing on more than 30 recordings. As a member of Musica Camerata Montreal and l’Ensemble de la Société de Musique Contemporaine du Québec, he premiered many works, including the Canadian premiere of Pierre Boulez’s Le Marteau sans maître. In addition, Mr. Langevin has performed as soloist with Quebec’s most distinguished ensembles and has recorded many recitals and chamber music programs for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. He also served on the faculty of the University of Montreal for nine years.

Born in Sherbrooke, Quebec, Robert Langevin began studying flute at age 12 and joined the local orchestra three years later. While studying with Jean-Paul Major at the Montreal Conservatory of Music, he started working in recording studios, where he accompanied a variety of artists of different styles. He graduated in 1976 with two first prizes, one in flute, the other, in chamber music. Not long after, he won the prestigious Prix d’Europe, a national competition open to all instruments with a first prize of a two-year scholarship to study in Europe. This enabled him to work with Aurèle Nicolet at the Staatliche Hochschule für Musik in Freiburg, Germany, where he graduated in 1979. He then went on to study with Maxence Larrieu, in Geneva, winning second prize at the Budapest International Competition in 1980.

Mr. Langevin is a member of the Philharmonic Quintet of New York with which he has performed concerts on many continents. In addition, he has given recitals and master classes throughout the United States and in countries such as Canada, Spain, Costa Rica, Japan, North Korea, Singapore, and Vietnam. He is currently on the faculties of The Juilliard School, The Manhattan School of Music, and the Orford International Summer Festival. 

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Nancy Allen

Harp

Nancy Allen

Harp

Nancy Allen

Harp

Hailed by The New York Times as “a major artist” following her New York recital debut in 1975, Nancy Allen joined the New York Philharmonic in June of 1999 as Principal Harp. She maintains a busy international concert schedule as well as heading the harp departments of The Juilliard School and the Aspen Music Festival and School, and teaching at Stony Brook University. In addition, Ms. Allen appears regularly with The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra. In May 2000 Ms. Allen was featured in the Philharmonic’s US Premiere of Siegfried Matthus’s Concerto for Flute, Harp, and Orchestra, with Music Director Emeritus Kurt Masur and Principal Flute Robert Langevin.

Ms. Allen’s busy performing schedule includes solo appearances at major international festivals, and has featured collaborations with soprano Kathleen Battle, clarinetist Richard Stoltzman, and guitarist Manuel Barrueco, and with flutist Carol Wincenc and Philharmonic Principal Viola Cynthia Phelps in their trio, Les Amies. She has appeared on PBS’s Live From Lincoln Center with The Chamber Music Society, as well as with Ms. Battle, and has performed as a recitalist for “Music at the Supreme Court” in Washington, D.C. Ms. Allen’s recording of Ravel’s Introduction and Allegro with the Tokyo Quartet, flutist Ransom Wilson, and clarinetist David Shifrin received a Grammy Award nomination; she can also be heard on Sony Classical, Deutsche Grammophon, and CRI.

Ms. Allen is a native of New York, where she studied with Pearl Chertok and undertook private lessons in piano and oboe. The summer of 1972 took her to Paris, where she studied with Lily Laskine. During that same year, she entered The Juilliard School to study with Marcel Grandjany. In 1973, Ms. Allen won the Fifth International Harp Competition, in Israel, and was later awarded a National Endowment for the Arts Solo Recitalist Award.

Ms. Allen’s students hold positions in prominent orchestras around the world. She currently resides in New York with her daughter, Claire, who studies piano and cello.

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