Saturday Matinee: Stravinsky's Firebird

The New York Philharmonic

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Single tickets are on sale for the 2019–20 season. Save money on your purchase by choosing 3 or more eligible concerts and you’ll also enjoy exclusive subscriber benefits, including unlimited no-fee ticket exchanges.

Calendar

Saturday Matinee: Stravinsky's Firebird

Location

David Geffen Hall

Directions
Price Range

$33-$77

Date & Times

23

Feb, 2019

Saturday, 2:00 PM

Event Info

Saturday afternoon doesn’t get more thrilling than one with Stravinsky’s exotic Firebird, a daring ballet score with vibrant colors that glitter and pulse to fantastic effect. The concert starts with chamber music and continues after with a lively Q & A with Philharmonic musicians.

Program

Ibert

Trois pièces brèves

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Gounod

Petite symphonie, for Winds

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Stravinsky

The Firebird (complete)

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Artists

Matthias Pintscher

Conductor

Matthias Pintscher

Conductor

Matthias Pintscher Felix Broede

Conductor

Matthias Pintscher is music director of Ensemble intercontemporain, the contemporary music ensemble founded by Pierre Boulez. Equally known as one of today’s foremost composers, Mr. Pintscher will have two works premiered this season: Nur, a concerto for piano and ensemble performed by Daniel Barenboim and the Boulez Ensemble conducted by the composer, and a new work for baritone, chorus, and orchestra performed by Dietrich Henschel and Zurich’s Tonhalle Orchestra led by Kent Nagano.

This season Mr. Pintscher serves as creative chair for Zurich’s Tonhalle Orchestra and artist-in-residence at the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, and he is finishing a nine-year term as the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra’s artist-in-association. Additionally, he makes his debuts with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, Rotterdam Philharmonic, and Berlin Staatsoper, where he conducts the World Premiere of Violetter Schnee, a new opera by Beat Furrer. He returns to conduct the New York Philharmonic, leading the New York Premiere of his own mar’eh and curating a Kravis Nightcap event, as well as The Cleveland Orchestra and the Chicago, Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Milwaukee, and New World symphony orchestras. In Europe, Mr. Pintscher returns to the Orchestre de Paris, Danish National Symphony Orchestra, and Helsinki Philharmonic.

Learn more about Matthias Pintscher
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Robert Langevin

Flute

Robert Langevin

Flute

Robert Langevin

Flute

With the start of the 2000–01 season, Robert Langevin joined the New York Philharmonic as Principal Flute, in The Lila Acheson Wallace Chair. In May 2001, he made his solo debut with the Orchestra in the North American premiere of Siegfried Matthus’s Concerto for Flute and Harp with Philharmonic Principal Harp Nancy Allen and Music Director Kurt Masur. His October 2012 solo performance in Nielsen’s Flute Concerto, conducted by Music Director Alan Gilbert, was recorded for inclusion in The Nielsen Project, the Orchestra’s multi-season traversal of all of the Danish composer’s symphonies and concertos, to be released by Dacapo Records.

Prior to the Philharmonic, Mr. Langevin held the Jackman Pfouts Principal Flute Chair of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and was an adjunct professor at Duquesne University, in Pittsburgh. Mr. Langevin served as associate principal of the Montreal Symphony Orchestra for 13 years, playing on more than 30 recordings. As a member of Musica Camerata Montreal and l’Ensemble de la Société de Musique Contemporaine du Québec, he premiered many works, including the Canadian premiere of Pierre Boulez’s Le Marteau sans maître. In addition, Mr. Langevin has performed as soloist with Quebec’s most distinguished ensembles and has recorded many recitals and chamber music programs for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. He also served on the faculty of the University of Montreal for nine years.

Born in Sherbrooke, Quebec, Robert Langevin began studying flute at age 12 and joined the local orchestra three years later. While studying with Jean-Paul Major at the Montreal Conservatory of Music, he started working in recording studios, where he accompanied a variety of artists of different styles. He graduated in 1976 with two first prizes, one in flute, the other, in chamber music. Not long after, he won the prestigious Prix d’Europe, a national competition open to all instruments with a first prize of a two-year scholarship to study in Europe. This enabled him to work with Aurèle Nicolet at the Staatliche Hochschule für Musik in Freiburg, Germany, where he graduated in 1979. He then went on to study with Maxence Larrieu, in Geneva, winning second prize at the Budapest International Competition in 1980.

Mr. Langevin is a member of the Philharmonic Quintet of New York with which he has performed concerts on many continents. In addition, he has given recitals and master classes throughout the United States and in countries such as Canada, Spain, Costa Rica, Japan, North Korea, Singapore, and Vietnam. He is currently on the faculties of The Juilliard School, The Manhattan School of Music, and the Orford International Summer Festival. 

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Sherry Sylar

Oboe

Sherry Sylar

Oboe

Sherry Sylar

Oboe

Sherry Sylar joined the New York Philharmonic in 1984 as Associate Principal Oboe; she currently serves as Acting Principal Oboe, The Alice Tully Chair. She was the Orchestra’s Acting Principal Oboe during the 2005–06 season and has also served as guest principal oboe for other major orchestras, including the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (in December 2015, led by Riccardo Muti), Boston Symphony Orchestra (in its 2001 tour, led by Bernard Haitink), the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France (for its 2003 Carnegie Hall debut, conducted by Myung-Whun Chung), the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra (in its 2007 American tour), and the St. Louis Symphony. Prior to joining the New York Philharmonic she was a member of the Louisville Orchestra. She was among the select group of Philharmonic musicians who joined the orchestra that Leonard Bernstein conducted in the historic Freedom Concert at the falling of the Berlin Wall in 1989.

As a featured soloist with the New York Philharmonic, she has performed Haydn’s Sinfonia Concertante in B-flat major, conducted by Jeffrey Kahane, and Bach’s Concerto for Violin and Oboe, with the Orchestra’s Principal Associate Concertmaster Sheryl Staples, conducted by Kent Nagano. In 1989 she was soloist in the Orchestra’s performances and recording of Handel’s Oboe Concerto in G minor, Zubin Mehta conducting. She also serves as the New York Philharmonic’s oboe d’amore player, and she earned praise from The New York Times for her solos on that instrument during the orchestra’s 2013 The Bach Variations: A Philharmonic Festival. In March 2016 she performed the World Premiere of Pablo Furman’s Concerto for Oboe and Strings with the San Jose Chamber Orchestra.

An avid performer of chamber music, she appears often in the concerts of the New York Philharmonic Ensembles and has participated in the Aspen and Grand Teton Music Festivals. She played Luciano Berio’s Sequenza VIIa for solo oboe at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater as part of the New York Philharmonic’s celebration of the late composer in 2008. She is also a member of the Philharmonic Quintet of New York, which was formed in 2001 to give concerts for workers in the World Trade Center area following the disaster of 9/11. The quintet has gone on to give master classes and recitals worldwide and is preparing its first CD.

Ms. Sylar gives master classes for oboists internationally and was invited to China as a judge for the Beijing National Orchestra’s first-ever auditions. A native of Chattanooga, Tennessee, she earned her bachelor’s degree at Indiana University and her master’s degree from Northwestern University. She formerly taught at the University of Evansville in Indiana and since 2005 has served on the oboe faculty of Mannes College The New School for Music in New York City. Her new CD, Oboe Dolce, includes solo oboe and chamber music featuring Principal Bassoon Judith LeClair, Principal Viola Cynthia Phelps, Harriet Wingreen, Jonathan Feldman, Yi Fang Wang, and Norman Weiss. 

Learn more about Sherry Sylar

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Ryan Roberts

Ryan Roberts

Oboist Ryan Roberts was first-prize winner of the International Double Reed Society’s 2018 Young Artist Competition and the National Society of Arts and Letters’s 2018 Woodwind Competition. He recently premiered Michael Torke’s Oboe Concertino with the Albany Symphony and recorded the work for Albany Records. As a Kovner Fellow graduate of The Juilliard School, he studied with Elaine Douvas and appeared frequently as principal oboist of The Juilliard Orchestra. After graduating, he began a fellowship with New World Symphony and has since performed with the New York Philharmonic, The Philadelphia Orchestra, The Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, and Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Roberts has spent three summers as the oboe fellow at the Aspen Music Festival, and he will appear at the Marlboro Music Festival in 2019. Originally from Los Angeles, Ryan Roberts studied with David Weiss, former principal oboist of the Los Angeles Philharmonic. He toured the United States and Europe as a member of Carnegie Hall’s National Youth Orchestra. He has also studied piano since the age 5, and won third prize in the Bravura International Piano Competition in 2014.

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Anthony McGill

Clarinet

Anthony McGill

Clarinet

Anthony McGill

Clarinet

Anthony McGill joined the New York Philharmonic as Principal Clarinet, The Edna and W. Van Alan Clark Chair, in September 2014, becoming the Philharmonic’s first African American Principal player. Hailed for his “trademark brilliance, penetrating sound and rich character” (The New York Times) and “exquisite combination of technical refinement and expressive radiance” (The Baltimore Sun), he is recognized as one of the classical music world’s finest solo, chamber, and orchestral musicians. Mr. McGill also serves as an ardent advocate for helping music education reach underserved communities and for addressing issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion in classical music. He took part in the inauguration of President Barack Obama, premiering a piece written for the occasion by John Williams alongside violinist Itzhak Perlman, cellist Yo-Yo Ma, and pianist Gabriela Montero.

Anthony McGill’s 2018–19 season includes performances of concertos by William Bolcom, Copland, Mozart, and R. Strauss with the New York Philharmonic, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Tallahassee Symphony, Vermont Symphony, and Austin Symphonic Band. He also collaborated with soprano Miah Persson in a performance of Schubert’s The Shepherd on the Rock with the New York Philharmonic, led by Iván Fischer. Additional performances include a collaboration with the Dover Quartet for the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society and a recital with soprano Julia Bullock for The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s MetLiveArts performance series, along with collaborations with the Brentano Quartet for Princeton University and a tour of Asia with The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center.

Anthony McGill appears regularly as a soloist with top orchestras around North America, including the New York Philharmonic, The Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, Baltimore Symphony, San Diego Symphony, and Kansas City Symphony. As a chamber musician, he is a favorite collaborator of the Brentano, Daedalus, Guarneri, JACK, Miró, Pacifica, Shanghai, Takacs, and Tokyo Quartets, as well as Emanuel Ax, Inon Barnatan, Gloria Chien, Yefim Bronfman, Gil Shaham, Midori, Mitsuko Uchida, and Lang Lang. He has led tours with Musicians from Marlboro and regularly performs for The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society. Festival appearances include Tanglewood, Marlboro, Mainly Mozart, and Music@Menlo as well as the Santa Fe, Seattle, and Skaneateles Chamber Music Festivals.

In January 2015, McGill recorded Nielsen’s Clarinet Concerto with the New York Philharmonic, led by then Music Director Alan Gilbert, released on Dacapo Records. He also recorded two albums released by Cedille Records: one with his brother, Seattle Symphony principal flute Demarre McGill, and pianist Michael McHale, and the other featuring the Mozart and Brahms Clarinet Quintets with the Pacifica Quartet.

A dedicated champion of new music, Anthony McGill premiered Richard Danielpour’s From the Mountaintop in 2014, written for him and commissioned by the New Jersey Symphony, Kansas City Symphony, and Orchestra 2001. He served as the 2015–16 Artist-in-Residence for WQXR and has appeared on Performance Today, MPR’s Saint Paul Sunday, and Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood. In 2013 he appeared on NBC Nightly News and MSNBC in stories about the McGill brothers.

A graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music, Anthony McGill previously served as principal clarinet of The Metropolitan Opera Orchestra and associate principal clarinet of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. In-demand as a teacher, he serves on the faculty of The Juilliard School, the Curtis Institute of Music, and the Bard College Conservatory of Music. He also serves as artistic director of the Music Advancement Program at Juilliard, on the Board of Directors for both the League of American Orchestras and the Harmony Program, and on the advisory council for the InterSchool Orchestras of New York.

Learn more about Anthony McGill

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Pavel Vinnitsky

Clarinet

Pavel Vinnitsky

Clarinet

male silhouette

Clarinet

Clarinetist Pavel Vinnitsky leads a versatile career as a soloist, recording artist, chamber musician, and orchestral musician. He has been an associate clarinetist with The Metropolitan Opera Orchestra since 2009. Pavel Vinnitsky appears regularly as a guest artist with the New York Philharmonic, The Philadelphia Orchestra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and the Orchestra of St. Luke’s. In addition, Mr. Vinnitsky holds positions of principal clarinet with the Stamford Symphony Orchestra in Connecticut and with the Broadway production of Les Misérables. In demand as chamber musician, Pavel is a member of ClariAnna Duo and frequently performs with the Wind Soloists of New York, the St. Luke’s Chamber Ensemble, and the International Contemporary Ensemble. He is on the clarinet faculty at NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.

Learn more about Pavel Vinnitsky

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Judith LeClair

Bassoon

Judith LeClair

Bassoon

Judith LeClair

Bassoon

Judith LeClair joined the New York Philharmonic as Principal Bassoon in 1981, at the age of 23. Since then, she has made more than 50 solo appearances with the Orchestra, performing with conductors such as Sir Colin Davis, Sir Andrew Davis, Alan Gilbert, Christopher Hogwood, Rafael Kubelik, Erich Leinsdorf, Lorin Maazel, Kurt Masur, Zubin Mehta, André Previn, John Williams, and Andrey Boreyko.

Ms. LeClair is a graduate of the Eastman School of Music, where she studied with K. David Van Hoesen. She made her professional debut with The Philadelphia Orchestra at age 15, playing Mozart’s Sinfonia concertante with colleagues from the Settlement Music School in Philadelphia, where she studied with Shirley Curtiss. Before joining the New York Philharmonic, she was Principal Bassoonist for two seasons with the San Diego Symphony and San Diego Opera.  

Active as a chamber musician, she has performed with numerous leading artists and has participated in leading festivals around the country. She has given solo recitals and master classes at the Eastman School of Music, Northwestern University, New England Conservatory, Oberlin College, University of Michigan, Ohio University, and the University of Colorado at Boulder. Every August she gives a solo recital and week-long master class at the Hidden Valley Music Seminar in Carmel Valley, California. She performed with the Philharmonic Woodwind Quintet of New York, formed in 2001 with her colleagues from the New York Philharmonic wind section. They gave recitals throughout the country and on the Orchestra’s foreign tours.

In April 1995 Ms. LeClair premiered The Five Sacred Trees, a concerto written for her by John Williams and commissioned by the New York Philharmonic as part of its 150th Anniversary celebration. She later performed the concerto with the San Francisco Symphony and with the Royal Academy Orchestra in London. She recorded it for Sony Classical with the London Symphony Orchestra in June 1996, with Mr. Williams conducting. This, along with her solo New York Legends CD for Cala Records, was released in March 1997. Her newest CD, Works for Bassoon, was released in the spring of 2010.

Ms. LeClair is on the faculty of The Juilliard School, and she will join the faculty of the Manhattan School of Music in fall 2014. She lives in New Jersey with her husband, pianist Jonathan Feldman, and their son, Gabriel.

Learn more about Judith LeClair

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Roger Nye

Bassoon

Roger Nye

Bassoon

Roger Nye

Bassoon

Bassoonist Roger Nye joined the New York Philharmonic in September 2005 after serving as the second bassoonist of the Omaha Symphony for 11 seasons. Raised in Michigan, he attended the Interlochen Arts Academy for the last two years of high school, where he studied with Robert Barris, now bassoon instructor at Northwestern University. Mr. Nye earned his bachelor of music degree from the Eastman School of Music, where he was a student of K. David Van Hoesen; he continued his studies at the USC School of Music, where he received his master’s in bassoon performance with Norman Herzberg, son-in-law and student of former New York Philharmonic second bassoonist Simon Kovar.

While a student at the Eastman School he participated in two important recording projects. The first: playing contrabassoon on the Eastman Wind Ensemble’s recording of cornet solos with Wynton Marsalis; the second, playing contrabassoon on the Eastman Philharmonia’s recording, with flutist Sir James Galway, of the world premiere of John Corigliano’s Pied Piper Fantasy. Other recordings of note include the Sydney Symphony Orchestra’s recording of Stravinsky’s complete Firebird (as principal bassoon) with Edo De Waart conducting. Mr. Nye moved to Sydney, Australia, with his wife, oboist Caroline Park, in 1997, after winning the position of principal bassoon there. He has also served as principal bassoon of the Buffalo Philharmonic and the South Dakota Symphony.

In summer, Mr. Nye has performed with the National Repertory Orchestra, where he was soloist with violinist Joseph Silverstein in Haydn’s Sinfonia Concertante, and at the Peninsula Music Festival, Door County, Wisconsin, where he served as both principal and solo bassoon. He resides in New Jersey with his wife, Caroline, and their son, Zeke.

Learn more about Roger Nye

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Richard Deane

Horn

Richard Deane

Horn

Richard Deane

Horn

Richard Deane joined the New York Philharmonic as Associate Principal Horn in September 2014; he currently serves as Acting Principal Horn. Previously, he served as third horn of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra since 1987, participating in more than 80 recordings, including 20 Grammy Award winners, for Telarc International. He also performed with the Atlanta Chamber Players and was a member of the Atlanta Symphony Brass Quintet, with which he toured Norway as part of the Olympic cultural exchange between Lillehammer and Atlanta. Mr. Deane has also served as principal horn with the Colorado Philharmonic and the Concerto Soloists of Philadelphia, and in 1987 he earned first prize in the American Horn Competition.

In May 1999 Mr. Deane was a featured artist at the International Horn Society Convention held at the University of Georgia in Athens. In addition to teaching master classes at The Juilliard School, Manhattan School of Music, University of Cincinnati College–Conservatory of Music, Georgia State University, Cleveland State University, and Eastern Kentucky University, he was visiting professor of horn at the University of Georgia from 2006 to 2014. He serves as principal horn of the Brevard Music Festival in North Carolina each summer. His article “The Third Horn Brahms Experience” was published in the spring 2007 edition of The Horn Call, the journal of the International Horn Society, and his first method book, The Efficient Approach: Accelerated Development for the Horn, was published by the Atlanta Brass Society Press.

A native of Richmond, Kentucky, Richard Deane began his horn studies with Stanley Lawson. He received a master of music degree from The Juilliard School, where he studied with Myron Bloom, and a bachelor of music degree, summa cum laude, from the University of Cincinnati College–Conservatory of Music, where he studied with Michael Hatfield. His other teachers have included Jerry Peel at the University of Miami and David Wakefield at the Aspen Music Festival and School.

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R. Allen Spanjer

Horn

R. Allen Spanjer

Horn

R. Allen Spanjer

Horn

R. Allen Spanjer joined the New York Philharmonic as Second Horn, The Rosalind Miranda Chair, in February 1993. His appearances with the Orchestra as a featured soloist have included performances of Schumann’s Konzertstück for Four Horns in 1995 and 2001, as well as on the Philharmonic’s 1996 European Festivals Tour and 2001 Latin American Tour, conducted by then Music Director Kurt Masur. He was also featured in 1996 in Vivaldi’s Concerto for Two Horns with Principal Horn Philip Myers, also conducted by Mr. Masur.

Prior to joining the Philharmonic, Mr. Spanjer was a full-time freelance musician in New York City, performing in a broad range of classical and commercial settings. During this time he was also a frequent substitute with the New York Philharmonic, as well as with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, and he spent one season as Second Horn of the Orquesta Filarmonica de la UNAM in Mexico.

A Georgia native, R. Allen Spanjer began horn lessons at age 13. He was a pupil of Norman Schweikert at the Interlochen Arts Academy and later studied with former Philharmonic hornist Ranier De Intinis at The Juilliard School. He also studied at the Brevard Music Center, Aspen Music Festival with Philip Farkas, SUNY Purchase with Paul Ingraham, Waterloo Music Festival with Martin Smith, Tanglewood Festival with Harry Shapiro, and privately in New York City with Carmine Caruso.

Mr. Spanjer maintains as active teaching studio, and is frequently a guest performer and teacher at music schools around the United States. In addition to his New York Philharmonic work and teaching horn, he is a certified instructor of the Alexander Technique, having graduated from the American Center for the Alexander Technique in New York City in 1981. He is on faculty at the Manhattan School of Music and frequently performs as a chamber musician. He has written for The Horn Call, the journal of the International Horn Society. In addition, he was featured at the 1999 Symposium of the International Horn Society, as well as the 2000 and 2001 Northeast Horn Workshops.

Learn more about R. Allen Spanjer

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