175th Anniversary Concert: Beethoven's Fifth Symphony and Mozart

The New York Philharmonic

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CYO

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Calendar

Beethoven's Fifth Symphony and Mozart

Location

David Geffen Hall

Directions
Price Range

$42-166

Duration

1 hour & 30 minutes with intermission

Date & Times

6

Dec, 2017

Wednesday, 7:30 PM

7

Dec, 2017

Thursday, 7:30 PM

8

Dec, 2017

Friday, 2:00 PM

9

Dec, 2017

Saturday, 8:00 PM

Event Info

175th Birthday Concert

Celebrate the Philharmonic’s 175th birthday with Alan Gilbert conducting Beethoven’s immortal Fifth Symphony. Rising from the unmistakable four-note opening, it transports us from tragedy to triumph, from darkness into the light. Featuring a virtuoso quartet of Philharmonic wind principals, Mozart’s Sinfonia concertante is guaranteed to delight with its entrancing melodies, elegance, and vibrancy.

Program

Weber

Oberon Overture

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Mozart

Sinfonia concertante for Winds

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Beethoven

Symphony No. 5

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Artists

Alan Gilbert

Conductor

Alan Gilbert

Conductor

Alan Gilbert

Conductor

Alan Gilbert, former Music Director of the New York Philharmonic, launches his tenure as chief conductor of Hamburg’s NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra in September 2019. The Grammy Award–winning conductor previously served as principal guest conductor of the orchestra (then known as NDR Symphony Orchestra Hamburg) for more than a decade, and began serving as chief conductor designate in 2017, shortly after the opening of the orchestra’s already iconic new home. This position follows his truly transformative eight-year tenure as Music Director of the New York Philharmonic, during which, through such key initiatives as the NY PHIL BIENNIAL, he succeeded in making the Orchestra a leader on the cultural landscape. Alan Gilbert is also conductor laureate of the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic and the founder and president of Musicians for Unity. With the endorsement and guidance of the United Nations, this new organization will bring together musicians from around the world to perform in support of peace, development, and human rights.

Alan Gilbert makes regular guest appearances with orchestras including the Berlin Philharmonic, Amsterdam’s Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, The Cleveland Orchestra, Boston Symphony Orchestra, The Philadelphia Orchestra, Dresden Staatskapelle, and Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France. He has led operatic productions for Milan’s Teatro alla Scala, The Metropolitan Opera, Los Angeles Opera, Zurich Opera, Royal Swedish Opera, and Santa Fe Opera, where he was the inaugural music director.

His discography includes The Nielsen Project, a box set recorded with the New York Philharmonic, and John Adams’s Doctor Atomic, captured on DVD at The Metropolitan Opera, for which he won a Grammy Award. He received Emmy Award nominations for Outstanding Music Direction in PBS’s Live From Lincoln Center broadcasts of two star-studded New York Philharmonic productions: of Sweeney Todd and Sinatra: Voice for a Century.

Alan Gilbert has received Honorary Doctor of Music degrees from the Curtis Institute of Music and Westminster Choir College, as well as Columbia University’s Ditson Conductor’s Award. He is a member of The American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and was named an Officier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French government. At The Juilliard School, he is the first holder of the William Schuman Chair in Musical Studies and serves as Director of Conducting and Orchestral Studies. After giving the annual Royal Philharmonic Society Lecture on Orchestras in the 21st Century: A New Paradigm during the New York Philharmonic’s EUROPE / SPRING 2015 tour, he received a 2015 Foreign Policy Association Medal for his commitment to cultural diplomacy.

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Anthony McGill

Clarinet

Anthony McGill

Clarinet

Anthony McGill

Clarinet

Anthony McGill joined the New York Philharmonic as Principal Clarinet, The Edna and W. Van Alan Clark Chair, in September 2014, becoming the Philharmonic’s first African American Principal player. Hailed for his “trademark brilliance, penetrating sound and rich character” (The New York Times) and “exquisite combination of technical refinement and expressive radiance” (The Baltimore Sun), he is recognized as one of the classical music world’s finest solo, chamber, and orchestral musicians. Mr. McGill also serves as an ardent advocate for helping music education reach underserved communities and for addressing issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion in classical music. He took part in the inauguration of President Barack Obama, premiering a piece written for the occasion by John Williams alongside violinist Itzhak Perlman, cellist Yo-Yo Ma, and pianist Gabriela Montero.

Anthony McGill’s 2019–20 season includes a premiere by Tyshawn Sorey at 92nd Street Y and a collaboration with mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato at Carnegie Hall. He will also perform the Copland Clarinet Concerto at the Kennedy Center’s SHIFT Festival of American Orchestras with the Jacksonville Symphony as well as concertos by Copland, Mozart, and Danielpour with the Richmond, Delaware, Alabama, Reno, and San Antonio symphony orchestras. Additional collaborations include programs with Gloria Chien, Demarre McGill, Michael McHale, Anna Polonsky, Arnaud Sussman, and the Pacifica Quartet.

Anthony McGill appears regularly as a soloist with top orchestras around North America, including the New York Philharmonic, The Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, Baltimore Symphony, San Diego Symphony, and Kansas City Symphony. As a chamber musician, he is a favorite collaborator of the Brentano, Daedalus, Guarneri, JACK, Miró, Pacifica, Shanghai, Takacs, and Tokyo Quartets, as well as Emanuel Ax, Inon Barnatan, Gloria Chien, Yefim Bronfman, Gil Shaham, Midori, Mitsuko Uchida, and Lang Lang. He has led tours with Musicians from Marlboro and regularly performs for The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society. Festival appearances include Tanglewood, Marlboro, Mainly Mozart, and Music@Menlo as well as the Santa Fe, Seattle, and Skaneateles Chamber Music Festivals.

In January 2015, McGill recorded Nielsen’s Clarinet Concerto with the New York Philharmonic, led by then Music Director Alan Gilbert, released on Dacapo Records. He also recorded two albums released by Cedille Records: one with his brother, Seattle Symphony principal flute Demarre McGill, and pianist Michael McHale, and the other featuring the Mozart and Brahms Clarinet Quintets with the Pacifica Quartet.

A dedicated champion of new music, Anthony McGill premiered Richard Danielpour’s From the Mountaintop in 2014, written for him and commissioned by the New Jersey Symphony, Kansas City Symphony, and Orchestra 2001. He served as the 2015–16 Artist-in-Residence for WQXR and has appeared on Performance Today, MPR’s Saint Paul Sunday, and Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood. In 2013 he appeared on NBC Nightly News and MSNBC in stories about the McGill brothers.

A graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music, Anthony McGill previously served as principal clarinet of The Metropolitan Opera Orchestra and associate principal clarinet of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. In-demand as a teacher, he serves on the faculty of The Juilliard School, the Curtis Institute of Music, and the Bard College Conservatory of Music. He also serves as artistic director of the Music Advancement Program at Juilliard, on the Board of Directors for both the League of American Orchestras and the Harmony Program, and on the advisory council for the InterSchool Orchestras of New York.

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Judith LeClair

Bassoon

Judith LeClair

Bassoon

Judith LeClair

Bassoon

Judith LeClair joined the New York Philharmonic as Principal Bassoon in 1981, at the age of 23. Since then, she has made more than 50 solo appearances with the Orchestra, performing with conductors such as Sir Colin Davis, Sir Andrew Davis, Alan Gilbert, Christopher Hogwood, Rafael Kubelik, Erich Leinsdorf, Lorin Maazel, Kurt Masur, Zubin Mehta, André Previn, John Williams, and Andrey Boreyko.

Ms. LeClair is a graduate of the Eastman School of Music, where she studied with K. David Van Hoesen. She made her professional debut with The Philadelphia Orchestra at age 15, playing Mozart’s Sinfonia concertante with colleagues from the Settlement Music School in Philadelphia, where she studied with Shirley Curtiss. Before joining the New York Philharmonic, she was Principal Bassoonist for two seasons with the San Diego Symphony and San Diego Opera.  

Active as a chamber musician, she has performed with numerous leading artists and has participated in leading festivals around the country. She has given solo recitals and master classes at the Eastman School of Music, Northwestern University, New England Conservatory, Oberlin College, University of Michigan, Ohio University, and the University of Colorado at Boulder. Every August she gives a solo recital and week-long master class at the Hidden Valley Music Seminar in Carmel Valley, California. She performed with the Philharmonic Woodwind Quintet of New York, formed in 2001 with her colleagues from the New York Philharmonic wind section. They gave recitals throughout the country and on the Orchestra’s foreign tours.

In April 1995 Ms. LeClair premiered The Five Sacred Trees, a concerto written for her by John Williams and commissioned by the New York Philharmonic as part of its 150th Anniversary celebration. She later performed the concerto with the San Francisco Symphony and with the Royal Academy Orchestra in London. She recorded it for Sony Classical with the London Symphony Orchestra in June 1996, with Mr. Williams conducting. This, along with her solo New York Legends CD for Cala Records, was released in March 1997. Her newest CD, Works for Bassoon, was released in the spring of 2010.

Ms. LeClair is on the faculty of The Juilliard School, and she will join the faculty of the Manhattan School of Music in fall 2014. She lives in New Jersey with her husband, pianist Jonathan Feldman, and their son, Gabriel.

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Richard Deane

Horn

Richard Deane

Horn

Richard Deane

Horn

Richard Deane joined the New York Philharmonic as Associate Principal Horn in September 2014; he currently serves as Acting Principal Horn. Previously, he served as third horn of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra since 1987, participating in more than 80 recordings, including 20 Grammy Award winners, for Telarc International. He also performed with the Atlanta Chamber Players and was a member of the Atlanta Symphony Brass Quintet, with which he toured Norway as part of the Olympic cultural exchange between Lillehammer and Atlanta. Mr. Deane has also served as principal horn with the Colorado Philharmonic and the Concerto Soloists of Philadelphia, and in 1987 he earned first prize in the American Horn Competition.

In May 1999 Mr. Deane was a featured artist at the International Horn Society Convention held at the University of Georgia in Athens. In addition to teaching master classes at The Juilliard School, Manhattan School of Music, University of Cincinnati College–Conservatory of Music, Georgia State University, Cleveland State University, and Eastern Kentucky University, he was visiting professor of horn at the University of Georgia from 2006 to 2014. He serves as principal horn of the Brevard Music Festival in North Carolina each summer. His article “The Third Horn Brahms Experience” was published in the spring 2007 edition of The Horn Call, the journal of the International Horn Society, and his first method book, The Efficient Approach: Accelerated Development for the Horn, was published by the Atlanta Brass Society Press.

A native of Richmond, Kentucky, Richard Deane began his horn studies with Stanley Lawson. He received a master of music degree from The Juilliard School, where he studied with Myron Bloom, and a bachelor of music degree, summa cum laude, from the University of Cincinnati College–Conservatory of Music, where he studied with Michael Hatfield. His other teachers have included Jerry Peel at the University of Miami and David Wakefield at the Aspen Music Festival and School.

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