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CYO

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Calendar

Insights at the Atrium: "From Tragedy to Triumph: A Survivor from Warsaw and the 'Ode to Joy'"

Location

David Rubenstein Atrium

Directions
Price Range

Free

Date & Times

24

Apr, 2017

Monday, 7:30 PM

Event Info

On this Holocaust Remembrance Day, discover how two musical works divided by tonality and 125 years of fateful history share many of the same aspirations. Musicologists Amy Wlodarski, The Leonard Bernstein Scholar-in-Residence Michael Beckerman, and Abby Anderton discuss these powerful musical settings and how the music in Schoenberg’s A Survivor from Warsaw and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, which Music Director Alan Gilbert conducts May 3–6 and 9, 2017, reflects the invincible nature and freedom of the human spirit.

Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis. Subscribers, Friends at the Fellow level and above, and Patrons may secure guaranteed admission by e-mailing AdultEd@nyphil.org.
 

Artists

Amy Wlodarski

Speaker

Amy Wlodarski

Speaker

Speaker

Amy Lynn Wlodarski is associate professor of music at Dickinson College, where she teaches music history and conducts the college choir, and where she has received both of the college’s institutional teaching awards and a pedagogical award from the Oral History Association. Dr. Wlodarski’s scholarly work explores the expressive and political dynamics that lie at the intersection of Jewish history, memory, and creativity; it specifically considers how 20th-century composers have responded to the Holocaust in their music, and how these works have been received over time in various performance spaces. Amy Lynn Wlodarski is the author of Musical Witness and Holocaust Representation (Cambridge, 2015) — the first book to attempt a thematic chronology of postwar Holocaust representation in music — and with Elaine Kelly is the co-editor of Art Outside the Lines: New Perspectives on GDR Art Culture (Rodopi/Brill, 2011), a volume dedicated to reconsidering the legacy of East German art. A leading scholar in postwar Jewish art music, Dr. Wlodarski has written on topics as diverse as Arnold Schoenberg, Richard Wagner’s anti-Semitism, and the Jewish musicians of Terezín. Her work has been commissioned for several valuable scholarly collections, including the Cambridge Companion to Jewish Music (Cambridge, 2015) and Dislocated Memories: Jews, Music, and Postwar German Culture (Oxford, 2014). She has published in the leading journals in her field, and her 2010 article on Steve Reich, “The Testimonial Aesthetics of Different Trains,” received the Irving Lowens Award for best musicological article from the Society for American Music. Her research has been supported by prestigious institutions, such as the Fulbright Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, Posen Foundation, and Presser Foundation. She was selected as a Harry T. Starr Fellow in Judaica at Harvard University in 2012–13, and is currently a fellow-in-residence at the Paul Sacher Stiftung in Basel, Switzerland. Dr. Wlodarski earned her doctorate in musicology from the Eastman School of Music. In addition to teaching and conducting at Dickinson College, she regularly conducts pre-concert forums for ensembles such as The Philadelphia Orchestra and Los Angeles Opera.

Learn more about Amy Wlodarski

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Michael Beckerman

Speaker

Michael Beckerman

Speaker

Michael Beckerman

Speaker

Michael Beckerman is Carroll and Milton Petrie Chair and Collegiate Professor of Music at New York University. He has written articles on such subjects as film scoring, music of the Roma (Gypsies), Mozart, Brahms, exiled composers, and music in the camps, as well as many studies and several books on Czech topics, including Dvořák and His World (Princeton University Press, 1993), Janáček as Theorist (Pendragon Press, 1994), New Worlds of Dvořák (W.W. Norton, 2003), Janáček and His World (Princeton, 2004), and Martinů’s Mysterious Accident (Pendragon, 2007). He has been a frequent contributor to The New York Times and was a regular guest on Live From Lincoln Center and other radio and television programs in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Dr. Beckerman lectures nationally and internationally and has organized many concerts and symposia. He was awarded the Janáček Medal by the Czech Ministry of Culture, is a recipient of the Dvořák Medal, and is also a Laureate of the Czech Music Council; he has twice received the Deems Taylor Award. He was chair of the New York University Department of Music (2004–13), served as distinguished professor at Lancaster University (2011–15), and last year received an honorary doctorate from Palacký University in the Czech Republic.

Learn more about Michael Beckerman

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Abby Anderton

Moderator

Abby Anderton

Moderator

Moderator

Abby Anderton is an assistant professor of music at Baruch College, City University of New York. She is currently writing a book concerning Berlin’s musical culture after 1945 entitled Rubble Music: Occupying the Ruins of Postwar Berlin. Her work has appeared in the Journal of Musicological Research and Music and Politics, and she has received fellowships from the Fulbright Commission, the Holocaust Educational Foundation, and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD).

Learn more about Abby Anderton

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