Beethoven First Piano Concerto & Mahler First Symphony

The New York Philharmonic

Update Browser

Pages don't look right?

You are using a browser that does not support the technology used on our website.

Please select a different browser or use your phone or tablet to access our site.

Download: Firefox | Chrome | Safari

If you're using Internet Explorer, please update to the latest version.

CYO

Single tickets are on sale for the 2019–20 season. Save money on your purchase by choosing 3 or more eligible concerts and you’ll also enjoy exclusive subscriber benefits, including unlimited no-fee ticket exchanges.

Calendar

Beethoven and Mahler

Play
Location

David Geffen Hall

Directions
Price Range

$29-140

Duration

2 hours with intermission

No Late Seating
Date & Times

15

Feb, 2017

Wednesday, 7:30 PM

16

Feb, 2017

Thursday, 7:30 PM

17

Feb, 2017

Friday, 2:00 PM

18

Feb, 2017

Saturday, 8:00 PM

Event Info

$50 ORCHESTRA SEATS AVAILABLE FOR FEBRUARY 15–17

Beethoven’s First Piano Concerto was said to have stirred him to the depth of his soul; our soloist is Inon Barnatan, “a true poet of the keyboard, refined, searching [and] unfailingly communicative” (Evening Standard). Then Manfred Honeck conducts Mahler’s heart-stopping First Symphony, which ranges from evocative birdcalls to the jubilant finale exclaimed by horns with upturned bells.

Program

Beethoven

Piano Concerto No. 1

Listen
×

Mahler

Symphony No. 1

Listen
×
Artists

Manfred Honeck

Conductor

Manfred Honeck

Conductor

Manfred Honeck Felix Broede

Conductor

Over the last quarter century, Manfred Honeck has firmly established himself as one of the world’s leading conductors, renowned for his distinctive interpretations and arrangements of a wide range of repertoire. For more than a decade, he has served as music director of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, continuing a legacy of music-making that is celebrated at home, abroad, and on recordings, including the Grammy Award–winning recording of Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5 and Barber’s Adagio for Strings (2018). Together, Mr. Honeck and the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra have served as cultural ambassadors for the city as one of the most frequently toured American orchestras. In addition to performing at Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center, the orchestra regularly appears in major European music capitals and at festivals — including the Beethovenfest Bonn, BBC Proms, Musikfest Berlin, Lucerne Festival, Rheingau Musik Festival, Grafenegg Festival, and the Salzburg Festival — and continues a close relationship with Vienna’s Musikverein.

Born in Austria, Mr. Honeck received his musical training at Vienna’s Academy of Music and for many years was a member of the Vienna Philharmonic and the Vienna Staatsoper Orchestra. He began his conducting career as assistant to Claudio Abbado and was subsequently engaged by the Zurich Opera House, where he was bestowed with the prestigious European Conductor’s Award. Following early posts as one of three main conductors of Leipzig’s MDR Symphony Orchestra and as principal guest conductor of the Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra, he was appointed music director of the Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra in Stockholm. For several years he also served as principal guest conductor of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra. From 2007 to 2011 he was music director of the Staatsoper Stuttgart. Operatic guest appearances include Semperoper Dresden, Royal Opera of Copenhagen, and Salzburg Festival.

As a guest conductor Mr. Honeck has worked with the Berlin Philharmonic, Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Dresden Staatskapelle, Amsterdam’s Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, London Symphony Orchestra, Orchestre de Paris, Orchestra dell’Accademia nazionale di Santa Cecilia, and Vienna Philharmonic. He is a regular guest with all the major American orchestras, including the New York Philharmonic, The Cleveland Orchestra, The Philadelphia Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic, and the San Francisco, Boston, and Chicago symphony orchestras.

Manfred Honeck has received honorary doctorates from several North American universities and was awarded the honorary title of Professor by the Austrian Federal President. An international jury of critics selected him as the International Classical Music Awards 2018 Artist of the Year.

Learn more about Manfred Honeck
×

Inon Barnatan

Piano

Inon Barnatan

Piano

Inon Barnatan

Piano

Israeli pianist Inon Barnatan is a recipient of both the Avery Fisher Career Grant and Lincoln Center’s Martin E. Segal Award. He has performed extensively with many of the world’s foremost orchestras, including the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Cleveland and Philadelphia Orchestras, San Francisco Symphony, Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, Royal Stockholm Symphony Orchestra, and Lisbon’s Gulbenkian Orchestra. He has worked with such conductors as Gustavo Dudamel, James Gaffigan, Susanna Mälkki, Matthias Pintscher, David Robertson, Thomas Søndergård, Michael Tilson Thomas, Edo de Waart, Pinchas Zukerman, and Jaap van Zweden. Passionate about contemporary music, the pianist has premiered new works composed for him by Matthias Pintscher, Sebastian Currier, and Avner Dorman.

In 2016–17 Inon Barnatan enters his third and final season as the New York Philharmonic’s inaugural Artist-in-Association, a position created to spotlight an emerging artist over the course of three seasons through both concerto and chamber music performances and by cultivating a relationship among the artist, the Orchestra, and the audience. He also makes debuts with the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, led by New York Philharmonic Music Director Alan Gilbert; Chicago Symphony Orchestra, led by Jesús López-Cobos; Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, led by Vasily Petrenko; and the Seattle Symphony, led by Ludovic Morlot. In addition to returning to the New York Philharmonic under Manfred Honeck, he embarks on three tours: of the U.S., with the Academy of St Martin in the Fields; of Europe, with cellist Alisa Weilerstein, his frequent recital partner; and of the U.S. again, performing a trio program with Ms. Weilerstein and Philharmonic Principal Clarinet Anthony McGill.

Inon Barnatan’s critically acclaimed discography includes Avie and Bridge recordings of Schubert’s solo piano works, as well as Darknesse Visible, which made The New York Times’s “Best of 2012” list. Last season he released Rachmaninov & Chopin: Cello Sonatas on Decca Classics with Ms. Weilerstein. 

Learn more about Inon Barnatan

×
×

Purchase 3 or more eligible concerts & save.

About Create Your Own Series:

Pick three (or more) concerts and and enjoy exclusive Subscriber Benefits including unlimited free ticket exchange. Ideal for concertgoers who want the ultimate in flexibility and the benefits of being a subscriber.

Subscriber Benefits:

  • Free, easy ticket exchange (available online or by phone)
  • Save on subscription concerts all year long
  • Priority notice on special events

How it Works:

  1. Look for the Create Your Own Series icon CYO eligible icon next to a concert and add it to your cart.
  2. Simply follow the directions in the shopping cart and enter promo code CREATE3 at check out.
Go to top