Messiaen in the Temple - Quartet for the End of Time
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All concerts and events through June 13, 2021 are cancelled. Learn more about our response to COVID-19. Support the Philharmonic by donating your tickets.

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Messiaen in the Temple: Quartet for the End of Time

Location

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Temple of Dendur

Directions
Date & Times

13

Mar, 2016

Sunday, 2:00 PM

Event Info

Tickets at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Part of Messiaen Week

Experience “the most ethereally beautiful music of the twentieth century” (The New Yorker) as never before at The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Temple of Dendur featuring Philharmonic musicians. Messiaen’s Quartet for the End of Time takes on new meaning at the Egyptian temple, relocated from the banks of the Nile to the Upper East Side. Featuring Philharmonic Music Director Alan Gilbert on violin.

Program

Messiaen

Quartet for the End of Time

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Artists

Alan Gilbert

Violin

Alan Gilbert

Violin

Alan Gilbert

Violin

Alan Gilbert, former Music Director of the New York Philharmonic, launches his tenure as chief conductor of Hamburg’s NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra in September 2019. The Grammy Award–winning conductor previously served as principal guest conductor of the orchestra (then known as NDR Symphony Orchestra Hamburg) for more than a decade, and began serving as chief conductor designate in 2017, shortly after the opening of the orchestra’s already iconic new home. This position follows his truly transformative eight-year tenure as Music Director of the New York Philharmonic, during which, through such key initiatives as the NY PHIL BIENNIAL, he succeeded in making the Orchestra a leader on the cultural landscape. Alan Gilbert is also conductor laureate of the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic and the founder and president of Musicians for Unity. With the endorsement and guidance of the United Nations, this new organization will bring together musicians from around the world to perform in support of peace, development, and human rights.

Alan Gilbert makes regular guest appearances with orchestras including the Berlin Philharmonic, Amsterdam’s Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, The Cleveland Orchestra, Boston Symphony Orchestra, The Philadelphia Orchestra, Dresden Staatskapelle, and Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France. He has led operatic productions for Milan’s Teatro alla Scala, The Metropolitan Opera, Los Angeles Opera, Zurich Opera, Royal Swedish Opera, and Santa Fe Opera, where he was the inaugural music director.

His discography includes The Nielsen Project, a box set recorded with the New York Philharmonic, and John Adams’s Doctor Atomic, captured on DVD at The Metropolitan Opera, for which he won a Grammy Award. He received Emmy Award nominations for Outstanding Music Direction in PBS’s Live From Lincoln Center broadcasts of two star-studded New York Philharmonic productions: of Sweeney Todd and Sinatra: Voice for a Century.

Alan Gilbert has received Honorary Doctor of Music degrees from the Curtis Institute of Music and Westminster Choir College, as well as Columbia University’s Ditson Conductor’s Award. He is a member of The American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and was named an Officier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French government. At The Juilliard School, he is the first holder of the William Schuman Chair in Musical Studies and serves as Director of Conducting and Orchestral Studies. After giving the annual Royal Philharmonic Society Lecture on Orchestras in the 21st Century: A New Paradigm during the New York Philharmonic’s EUROPE / SPRING 2015 tour, he received a 2015 Foreign Policy Association Medal for his commitment to cultural diplomacy.

Learn more about Alan Gilbert

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Inon Barnatan

Piano

Inon Barnatan

Piano

Inon Barnatan

Piano

Israeli pianist Inon Barnatan is a recipient of both the Avery Fisher Career Grant and Lincoln Center’s Martin E. Segal Award. He has performed extensively with many of the world’s foremost orchestras, including the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Cleveland and Philadelphia Orchestras, San Francisco Symphony, Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, Royal Stockholm Symphony Orchestra, and Lisbon’s Gulbenkian Orchestra. He has worked with such conductors as Gustavo Dudamel, James Gaffigan, Susanna Mälkki, Matthias Pintscher, David Robertson, Thomas Søndergård, Michael Tilson Thomas, Edo de Waart, Pinchas Zukerman, and Jaap van Zweden. Passionate about contemporary music, the pianist has premiered new works composed for him by Matthias Pintscher, Sebastian Currier, and Avner Dorman.

In 2016–17 Inon Barnatan enters his third and final season as the New York Philharmonic’s inaugural Artist-in-Association, a position created to spotlight an emerging artist over the course of three seasons through both concerto and chamber music performances and by cultivating a relationship among the artist, the Orchestra, and the audience. He also makes debuts with the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, led by New York Philharmonic Music Director Alan Gilbert; Chicago Symphony Orchestra, led by Jesús López-Cobos; Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, led by Vasily Petrenko; and the Seattle Symphony, led by Ludovic Morlot. In addition to returning to the New York Philharmonic under Manfred Honeck, he embarks on three tours: of the U.S., with the Academy of St Martin in the Fields; of Europe, with cellist Alisa Weilerstein, his frequent recital partner; and of the U.S. again, performing a trio program with Ms. Weilerstein and Philharmonic Principal Clarinet Anthony McGill.

Inon Barnatan’s critically acclaimed discography includes Avie and Bridge recordings of Schubert’s solo piano works, as well as Darknesse Visible, which made The New York Times’s “Best of 2012” list. Last season he released Rachmaninov & Chopin: Cello Sonatas on Decca Classics with Ms. Weilerstein. 

Learn more about Inon Barnatan

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Anthony McGill

Clarinet

Anthony McGill

Clarinet

Anthony McGill

Clarinet

Anthony McGill joined the New York Philharmonic as Principal Clarinet, The Edna and W. Van Alan Clark Chair, in September 2014, becoming the Philharmonic’s first African American Principal player. Hailed for his “trademark brilliance, penetrating sound and rich character” (The New York Times) and “exquisite combination of technical refinement and expressive radiance” (The Baltimore Sun), he is recognized as one of the classical music world’s finest solo, chamber, and orchestral musicians. Mr. McGill also serves as an ardent advocate for helping music education reach underserved communities and for addressing issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion in classical music. He took part in the inauguration of President Barack Obama, premiering a piece written for the occasion by John Williams alongside violinist Itzhak Perlman, cellist Yo-Yo Ma, and pianist Gabriela Montero.

Anthony McGill’s 2019–20 season includes a premiere by Tyshawn Sorey at 92nd Street Y and a collaboration with mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato at Carnegie Hall. He will also perform the Copland Clarinet Concerto at the Kennedy Center’s SHIFT Festival of American Orchestras with the Jacksonville Symphony as well as concertos by Copland, Mozart, and Danielpour with the Richmond, Delaware, Alabama, Reno, and San Antonio symphony orchestras. Additional collaborations include programs with Gloria Chien, Demarre McGill, Michael McHale, Anna Polonsky, Arnaud Sussman, and the Pacifica Quartet.

Anthony McGill appears regularly as a soloist with top orchestras around North America, including the New York Philharmonic, The Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, Baltimore Symphony, San Diego Symphony, and Kansas City Symphony. As a chamber musician, he is a favorite collaborator of the Brentano, Daedalus, Guarneri, JACK, Miró, Pacifica, Shanghai, Takacs, and Tokyo Quartets, as well as Emanuel Ax, Inon Barnatan, Gloria Chien, Yefim Bronfman, Gil Shaham, Midori, Mitsuko Uchida, and Lang Lang. He has led tours with Musicians from Marlboro and regularly performs for The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society. Festival appearances include Tanglewood, Marlboro, Mainly Mozart, and Music@Menlo as well as the Santa Fe, Seattle, and Skaneateles Chamber Music Festivals.

In January 2015, McGill recorded Nielsen’s Clarinet Concerto with the New York Philharmonic, led by then Music Director Alan Gilbert, released on Dacapo Records. He also recorded two albums released by Cedille Records: one with his brother, Seattle Symphony principal flute Demarre McGill, and pianist Michael McHale, and the other featuring the Mozart and Brahms Clarinet Quintets with the Pacifica Quartet.

A dedicated champion of new music, Anthony McGill premiered Richard Danielpour’s From the Mountaintop in 2014, written for him and commissioned by the New Jersey Symphony, Kansas City Symphony, and Orchestra 2001. He served as the 2015–16 Artist-in-Residence for WQXR and has appeared on Performance Today, MPR’s Saint Paul Sunday, and Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood. In 2013 he appeared on NBC Nightly News and MSNBC in stories about the McGill brothers.

A graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music, Anthony McGill previously served as principal clarinet of The Metropolitan Opera Orchestra and associate principal clarinet of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. In-demand as a teacher, he serves on the faculty of The Juilliard School, the Curtis Institute of Music, and the Bard College Conservatory of Music. He also serves as artistic director of the Music Advancement Program at Juilliard, on the Board of Directors for both the League of American Orchestras and the Harmony Program, and on the advisory council for the InterSchool Orchestras of New York.

Learn more about Anthony McGill

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Carter Brey

Cello

Carter Brey

Cello

Carter Brey

Cello

Carter Brey was appointed Principal Cello, The Fan Fox and Leslie R. Samuels Chair, of the New York Philharmonic in 1996. He made his official subscription debut with the Orchestra in May 1997 performing Tchaikovsky’s Rococo Variations under the direction of then Music Director Kurt Masur. He has since appeared as soloist almost every season, and was featured during The Bach Variations: A Philharmonic Festival, when he gave two performances of the cycle of all six of Bach’s cello suites. Most recently, he was the soloist in performances of Schumann’s Cello Concerto on the Orchestra’s CALIFORNIA 2016 tour, led by then Music Director Alan Gilbert.

He rose to international attention in 1981 as a prizewinner in the Rostropovich International Cello Competition. The winner of the Gregor Piatigorsky Memorial Prize, Avery Fisher Career Grant, Young Concert Artists’ Michaels Award, and other honors, he also was the first musician to win the Arts Council of America’s Performing Arts Prize.

Mr. Brey has appeared as soloist with virtually all the major orchestras in the United States, and performed under the batons of prominent conductors including Claudio Abbado, Semyon Bychkov, Sergiu Comissiona, and Christoph von Dohnányi. He is a member of the New York Philharmonic String Quartet, established in the 2016–17 season, and has made regular appearances with the Tokyo and Emerson string quartets,The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and at festivals such as Spoleto (both in the United States and Italy) and the Santa Fe and La Jolla Chamber Music festivals. He and pianist Christopher O’Riley recorded Le Grand Tango: Music of Latin America, a disc of compositions from South America and Mexico released on Helicon Records.

Mr. Brey was educated at the Peabody Institute, where he studied with Laurence Lesser and Stephen Kates, and at Yale University, where he studied with Aldo Parisot and was a Wardwell Fellow and a Houpt Scholar. His violoncello is a rare J.B. Guadagnini made in Milan in 1754.

Learn more about Carter Brey

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